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scamvacation

Scammers Don’t Take Summer Vacations

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Sandy Botkin

Co-founder at Taxbot
Sandy is a CPA, Tax Attorney, and former IRS trainer. He has authored many helpful books on the subject of taxes, including 7 Simple Ways to Legally Avoid Paying Taxes ( Click Here ), Lower Your Taxes: Big Time ( Click Here ), and Real Estate Tax Secrets of the Rich ( Click Here ).
Sandy Botkin
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Summertime may be approaching, and you will probably take a vacation. Sadly, scammers don’t take vacations. In fact, they work even harder in the summer as IRS has now issued a new warning about a new scam:

As taxpayers become more aware of scams, the bad guys are switching gears, too. Many taxpayers are aware that the IRS will never call to demand immediate payment over the phone, nor will the IRS call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill. Now, scammers are trying to trick taxpayers by sending a letter first. The letter threatens an IRS lien or levy based on bogus delinquent taxes owed to a nonexistent agency called the “Bureau of Tax Enforcement.” There is no such agency. The lien notification may also reference the IRS to make you think that the letter is legitimate.

Don’t engage or respond with scammers. Here’s what to do instead: 

If you receive a call from someone claiming to be from the IRS and you do not owe tax, or if you are immediately aware that it’s a scam, just hang up.

If you receive a robocall or telephone message from someone claiming to be from the IRS and you do not owe tax, or if you are immediately aware that it’s a scam, don’t call them back.

If you receive a phone call from someone claiming to be with the IRS, and you owe tax or think you may owe tax, do not give out any information. Call the IRS back at 1-800-829-1040 to find out more information.

Never open a link or attachment from an unknown or suspicious source. If you’re not sure about the authenticity of an email, don’t click on hyperlinks. A better bet is to go directly to the source’s main webpage. 

Use strong passwords to protect online accounts and use a unique password for each account. Longer is better, and don’t hesitate to lie about important details on websites since crooks may know some of your personal details.

Use two-or-multi factor authentication when possible. Two-factor authentication means that in addition to entering your username and password, you typically enter a security code sent to your mobile phone or other device.

Don’t fall for the tricks. Keep your personal information safe by remaining alert. And when in doubt, assume it’s a scam.


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Sandy Botkin

Sandy is a CPA, Tax Attorney, and former IRS trainer. He has authored many helpful books on the subject of taxes, including 7 Simple Ways to Legally Avoid Paying Taxes ( Click Here ), Lower Your Taxes: Big Time ( Click Here ), and Real Estate Tax Secrets of the Rich ( Click Here ).

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